Thursday, April 4, 2013

Lee Fullbright's "The Angry Woman Suite" Blitz and Giveaway

2012 DISCOVERY AWARD & GLOBAL E-BOOK AWARD NOMINEE




Raised in a crumbling New England mansion by four women with personalities as split as a cracked mirror, young Francis Grayson has an obsessive need to fix them all. There’s his mother, distant and beautiful Magdalene; his disfigured, suffocating Aunt Stella; his odious grandmother; and the bane of his existence, his abusive and delusional Aunt Lothian.

For years, Francis plays a tricky game of duck and cover with the women, turning to music to stay sane. He finds a friend and mentor in Aidan Madsen, schoolmaster, local Revolutionary War historian, musician and keeper of the Grayson women’s darkest secrets. In a skillful move by Fullbright, those secrets are revealed through the viewpoints of three different people–Aidan, Francis and Francis’stepdaughter, Elyse–adding layers of eloquent complexity to a story as powerful as it is troubling.

While Francis realizes his dream of forming his own big band in the 1940s, his success is tempered by the inner monster of his childhood, one that roars to life when he marries Elyse’s mother. Elyse becomes her stepfather’s favorite target, and her bitterness becomes entwined with a desire to know the real Francis Grayson.

For Aidan’s part, his involvement with the Grayson family only deepens, and secrets carried for a lifetime begin to coalesce as he seeks to enlighten Francis–and subsequently Elyse–of why the events of so many years ago matter now. The ugliness of deceit, betrayal and resentment permeates the narrative, yet there are shining moments of hope, especially in the relationship between Elyse and her grandfather.

Ultimately, as more of the past filters into the present, the question becomes: What is the truth, and whose version of the truth is correct? Fullbright never untangles this conundrum, and it only adds to the richness of this exemplary novel.—Kirkus Reviews

Enjoy an Excerpt from The Angry Woman Suite
ELYSE

1955

It is said that love is comfort, and that comfort comes from recognition of the beloved. Papa was the first to tell me this, and if it’s even a little bit true, then I took my comfort for granted, not realizing that one can’t truly appreciate the beloved until one yearns for the comfort to be returned. Even now, when I can’t sleep at night, when I can’t slow the speeding of my heart, when I can’t stop the replaying of what-if’s in my head, I take myself back to that place where cabbage roses dance on walls and my beloved reigns supreme; where I am queen of his heart and he is my comfort, and then and only then do I feel safe.



You’d think it would be enough, being able to conjure up at least a measure of my old, first love. Yet for a long while it wasn’t. Because I was incapable of stanching the nagging questions about my second, almost greater love. Questioning why Francis hadn’t seen the truth of it like Papa had; that the streak I’d struggled with hadn’t been born of badness; that badness wasn’t an intrinsic part of me like my eyes being blue.

But Francis, unfortunately, hadn’t been able to see through things the way Papa had, and that was because Francis had rarely felt safe. You could see it in the way Francis’s eyes got doubtful taking in a room, and the way he was always biting down on his lower lip. The way it looked as if he was always trying to keep himself from crying.



From Kirkus Reviews

"Secrets and lies suffuse generations of one Pennsylvania family . . . in a skillful move by Fullbright, those secrets are revealed through the viewpoints of three very different people . . . a superb debut that exposes the consequences of the choices we make and legacy's sometimes excruciating embrace.

From Midwest Book Review

"A very human story . . . a fine read focusing on the long lasting dysfunction of family."

"There is something fascinating in labyrinthine plot twists, which is what we have here, and I must applaud Fullbright for her keen and magical ability to pull it off with such aplomb."-Norm Goldman, Montreal Books Examiner and Bookpleasures.com

5 Stars ***** Reviewed by Joana James for Readers Favorite: "The Angry Woman Suite is quite a ride . . . very cleverly written . . . an outstanding novel."

Rating: 5.0 stars Reviewed by Anne B. for Readers Favorite:" Lee Fullbright is master of characterization."

Rating: 5.0 stars Reviewed by Alice D. for Readers Favorite:
"The Angry Woman Suite is a brilliant, complex, complicated story about talented, complicated people . . . this is a story to remember!"


Giveaway
Lee will be giving away a $50 Amazon gift certificate to one randomly drawn commenter at the end of the tour.

Lee Fullbright, a medical practice consultant in her non-writing life, lives on San Diego’s beautiful peninsula with her writing partner, Baby Rae, a 12-year-old rescued Australian cattle dog with attitude.        


The Angry Woman Suite, a Kirkus Critics’ pick, 5-starred Readers Favorite, and a Discovery Aware winner, is her first published novel. 

28 comments:

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    1. It's always fun to host your touring authors.

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  2. Welcome to the blog today Lee! Your book makes me think of this old house I once saw on the Maine coast. Wonderfully vivid images came to mind. Congratulations on the success of your book!

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    1. Thank you so much for this nice welcome! Your blog is beautiful.

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  3. Sounds like a very interesting book! :)

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    1. Good morning Rachael, Thanks for commenting ... glad you like the excerpt!

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  4. This story really sounds as though there are a lot of twists and turns before the end. Very interesting.

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  5. Hi MomJane, LOTS of twists and turns :) That's the fun part....

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  6. The book sounds very intriguing, I can't wait to read it.

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  7. Sweet. I really like the idea that I don't know the ending of a book before I get there. I love the complexity of The Angry Woman Suite!

    andralynn7 AT gmail DOT com

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    1. I love complexity, too ... makes life (and books) like a game, trying to figure out "who dunnit"-- thanks for the comment!

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  8. Which of the four women was it more interesting to create?

    fencingromein at hotmail dot com

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  9. The blurb just sounds so intriguing. It sounds like a richly complex story. How long did it take you to write it?
    catherinelee100 at gmail dot com

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  10. Loved the blurb. Can't wait to read.

    bmack31919 at yahoo dot com

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    1. I hope you do, and let me know what you think! Thanks for commenting!

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  11. Hi Shannon, To answer your question about which woman was the most interesting to create:
    Definitely Magdalene.

    Because she is Aidan's love interest (and theirs is a powerful love, not passing, so she is a woman of depth), AND a murder suspect ... so how to balance this dichotomy without descending into caricature? This was the challenge with Magdalene (and challenges, I think, are almost always interesting).

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  12. Hi Catherine, As to how long it too me to write The Angry Woman Suite:

    I wrote off and on, in-between my regular work and regular life-- which is a rather pathetic attempt to explain away the 5-6 years it took from conceptualization to a bound book. :)

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  13. Thanks for the comment, Ingeborg! I hope you do read it and that you'll send me your feedback.

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  14. Congratulations on the release of your debut novel. It's intriguing, to me, because of how complex it sounds. I'm sure you've been asked a million times already, but what was the inspiration for this novel?

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  15. Hi Karen, My inspiration was a visit to Washington’s Headquarters in Chadds Ford, PA, site of a lost Revolutionary War battle. I was wandering the old battlefield, and from literally out of nowhere, a thought came to me, about a young woman looking back on her early life and her own fight for freedom (from a nutty family) and I wondered if that fleeting thought could be a whole story (and analogy to the Chadds Ford battle)—and that was the start. Much of The Angry Woman Suite is centered in Chadds Ford. I appreciate the question!

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    1. Thank you. Your response just makes the book even more interesting!

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  16. Sounds very interesting! I'll definitely have to pick up a copy!
    -Amber
    goodblinknpark(AT)yahoo(DOT)Com

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  17. Nice excerpt

    bn100candg at hotmail dot com

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  18. The books sounds really good. Thanks for having the giveaway.

    Rose
    harnessrose(at)yahoo(dot)com

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  19. Thank you for the wonderful excerpt.

    marypres(AT)gmail(DOT)com

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  20. Loved the excerpt!! The book sounds great. Thanks for the awesome contest.

    mlawson17 at hotmail dot com

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