Monday, November 19, 2012

Torn Together: On Tour with Author Emlyn Chand

From her cheating boyfriend to her dead father and cold, judgmental mother, Daly knows she can’t trust others to be there when it counts. This cynicism begins to melt away when she meets Kashi, a light-hearted charmer from India, who decides he cares too much to let her fade into the background of her own life. After a series of false starts, their quirky romance carries them to India, where Daly must win the approval of Kashi’s family in order to seal their “forever.”

Meanwhile, Laine struggles to cope with the pain of early widowhood, fleeing into the pages of her well-worn library and emerging only to perform her duties as a social worker at the crisis pregnancy center. Although her daughter wants nothing more than to work as an artist, Laine doesn’t know how to redirect Daly to a more suitable profession without further damaging their tenuous relationship.

Can Laine look past her pain to learn from an unlikely mentor? Has Daly finally found someone whom she can trust? Will the women recognize their common bonds before the relationship is broken beyond repair?

"Torn Together," Emlyn Chand’s first sojourn into Literary/Women's Fiction, illustrates how our similarities often drive us apart.

From Torn Together
(Love in the Pharmacy):

He pretended to clack at the keys in an exaggerated pantomime. "All right, you're officially in the system. Now, what can I do for you?"

When she hesitated, Kashi encouraged her to continue with a swift nod. "Well, I was on my way home and started sneezing. Then I realized I'd forgotten to fill my prescription. I've got pretty severe hay fever."

"I understand. Please, give me a moment to contact your old pharmacy, and I will fill your prescription." Kashi walked out of earshot, then reappeared and went to the back of the pharmacy. He returned after a few moments carrying a little white paper bag with her name stapled to the front.

"Take one a day, preferably at the same time each day, and I think everything will be just fine." He rang up the purchase.

Daly handed him her credit card, which he refused.

"On the house," he insisted, slipping the ten dollar co-pay from his wallet into the register drawer.



Kashi winked. Then, feigning surprise, he said, "Oh, it seems you've been selected to respond to a brief in-store survey."

"More questions?"

"I'm sorry, every fifth customer gets selected. You have no choice but to respond." He cleared his throat loudly before carrying on. "First question: on a scale of one to five, five being the absolute best possible answer, how would you rate your satisfaction with your shopping experience today?"

"Five," she said, smiling.

He clicked a key on the register. "Okay—on the same scale of one to five, how attractive do you find your pharmacist today?"

"Kashi! It says that?"

"Please, you must answer the question."

"Five." She blushed and glanced toward her toes. When she looked back up, Kashi had a crestfallen expression on his face.

"Only five?" he asked meekly.

"You said five was the best possible answer!"

"Yes, but you could've picked the secret answer. If the subject feels strongly, she may volunteer six as an acceptable response."

"Okay, okay. Six!"

"Only six?" he mumbled, his brow pinched in distress.

She flicked the wrist he held poised over the register's keys. "Okay, fine. One billion!"

Tour Giveaway
Emlyn will be awarding a $50 Amazon GC and autographed copy of Torn Together to a randomly drawn commenter during the tour.
 
 A Reader's Opinion


 This isn't my usual read, but I like stepping outside preferred genres once in a while to possibly discover new authors. This is the first book I've read by this author, and I did find parts of it enjoyable. I applaud the author for weaving so many elements into the storyline, but it did feel a little crowded at times. I didn't really connect with the characters, but that could have been more because of the age group.

The author does a great job of sending the reader on a wild roller-coaster of emotions, and though it didn't last long, it was a great twist and kept the book interesting. Some may have a difficult time with the ups and downs, but they didn't really bother me--I prefer bits of surprise in this type of book. The international elements also added some nice flair to the story. 

I've noticed more swearing and sex in some young adult genre books than I have recently in adult books, which personally I find strange and unnecessary, but that's strictly a personal opinion. The language isn't excessive, but it's noticeable and I would say the book is geared more towards the college group.

I didn't click with the writing style, but overall the author penned an interesting book.

 
Meet the Author
Emlyn Chand emerged from the womb with a fountain pen clutched in her left hand (true story). When she's not writing, she runs a large book club in Ann Arbor and is the president of author PR firm Novel Publicity. Best known for her Young Adult novels, she is also developing a small, but devoted, following to her children's book series and is beginning to dapple in other genres as well. Emlyn enjoys connecting with readers and is available via almost every social media site in existence. Visit EmlynChand.com for more info. Don't forget to say "hi" to her sun conure Ducky!


 


11 comments:

  1. I was wondering about the title of this book. Even thought I haven't read it yet, I can understand the meaning behind it. But, how did it come about? Did you decide the title and did it have a different working title while you were writing it? If so, what was it?

    kareninnc at gmail dot com

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  2. Thank you for the honest review.

    Kit3247(at)aol(dot)com

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  3. Thank you for the review...sounds like an intense story!

    vitajex(at)aol(dot)com

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  4. Thanks for the review and the warning that it is more for the college age set

    fencingromein at hotmail dot com

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  5. Please keep in mind that the book being for the college-age group is just my opinion of it. Others may not feel the same way. :)

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  6. Hi, Ducky! I think you're the first reviewer who suggested that Torn Together my be good for college age readers.
    catherinelee100 at gmail dot com

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  7. Thanks for the thoughtful review, MK, and I'm glad you gave Torn Together a try. It's more for early twenty-somethings trying to navigate lives or for mothers with daughters. This is my only novel that isn't YA, which is why there's sex in it but not my other stuff. I keep it clean for the children, I promise!

    Em :-D

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  8. I liked giving it a try Emlyn and I'd read more of your books. :) I've been told your YA books are great.

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  9. The excerpt made me smile today.

    An honest review which I appreciate.

    marypres(AT)gmail(DOT)com

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  10. I love books with international elements. Scarlet Macaws are so beautiful. I am sure people will be exposed to things they are not used to. I am glad the author decided to add some flare in that way.

    chrysrawr@yahoo.com

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